Posts Tagged ‘brain damage’

Study Links MS To Different Area Of The Brain

Study Links MS To Different Area Of The Brain

A study has suggested evidence that MS may not only cause damage as a result of the visible lesions that the said disease can create. It may also affect other areas of the brain responsible for cognitive, motor as well as sensory functions. The results of the study are published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Researchers Discover MS Starts In Brain’s Outer Layers

Researchers Discover MS Starts In Brain's Outer Layers

Medical experts previously believed that multiple sclerosis may develop from deep inside the brain going out. But researchers have recently discovered that this may not be the case. There are also indications that MS may develop from the outermost parts of the brain going deeper. A collaborative effort between researchers from Mayo Clinic and the

Reduced Levels Of A Neurotransmitter Found In MS Patients

Reduced Levels Of A Neurotransmitter Found In MS Patients

Researchers have recently found out that MS patients show signs of damage from a particular area of the brain that also leads to a substantial reduction of an important neurotransmitter. These new findings can be used to help scientists better understand the condition and see it in a better light. The findings of the said

Active Mental Lifestyle And MS

Active Mental Lifestyle And MS

A recent study has shown that having an active mental lifestyle might help protect people with multiple sclerosis against the memory and learning problems associated with the disease. The said study was conducted by the researchers at the Kessler Foundation Research Center in West Orange , New Jersey. The results were published on the June

Protein May Help Repair Brain Damage Caused By MS

Protein May Help Repair Brain Damage Caused By MS

A study suggests that a type of protein that helps build the brain in infants and children may also be able to help in the effort to restore damage in the brain caused by multiple sclerosis. Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that a protein known as CXCR4 is