Red Wine Compound May Help Fight MS

Red wine it seems may not only be beneficial for the heart. Studies have shown that drinking red wine in moderation may help in keeping the heart healthy. Now it seems that a study may suggest that red wine may also be helpful in fighting multiple sclerosis.

A study of mice suffering from a condition similar to multiple sclerosis called Wallerian degeneration slow or WldS, showed some improvement when given a compound called resveratrol, which can be found in red wine.

Resveratrol has been known to have several beneficial properties in other previous experiments. Resveratrol have been known to be an effective anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer agent as well as its blood sugar lowering and beneficial effects on the heart.

In the recent study concerning mice with multiple sclerosis-like conditions, resveratrol was given as part of a possible treatment for their condition. According to the researchers from the University of Utah, the mice gained weight in the first two weeks after treatment. This is in spite nerve cell tissues did not show any positive effect five weeks into the experimental treatment.

But the fact that the mice gained weight is an encouraging sign. "They (the researchers) didn’t look at the tissue under the microscope in the first two weeks," said Dr. John Richert, the executive vice president for the research and clinical program of the Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Gaining weight is an encouraging sign in every multiple sclerosis treatment. The doctor said that one of the initial clinical signs of multiple sclerosis is weight loss. The weight loss leads to eventual loss of neurological function.

Although the study still poses some questions that are left unanswered, the encouraging signs that the use of resveratrol makes it a potential candidate for further study. The results of the recent study have given good evidence that the compound found in red wine should be further looked into to find out what really is its beneficial effect on diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

Source: nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_69493.html

 
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